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July 21st, 2017 Total archive posts: 984
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Conduct Only Corporate America Could Appreciate

There's little argument that the current CEO of Porsche, Wendelin Wiedeking, brought painful culture change that led the auto manufacturer to become the most profitable in the world. Those profits have allowed Porsche to gain a major share in the Volkswagen Auto Group (which includes Audi, Lamborghini, Bugatti, and others) and may soon lead to a takeover. While I can't stand Porsche's current obsession with SUVs and 4-door sedans, it's clear that Wiedeking is among the best automotive CEOs in the world.

So it should come as no surprise that the current CEO of Volkswagen, Ferdinand Piech, wants Weidekeing out. It's that lovely? I can't read German, so I'll miss out on how Piech tries to justify that one to the board.

by Christopher Heiser on February 20 15:34

Gitmo Trials Fixed?

According to the former chief prosecutor, absolutely. Let's put this in perspective: a career lawyer in the military who had spent probably 20 years rising through the ranks to achieve a senior position and the rank of Colonel abruptly resigns his commission because:

"I said to him that if we come up short and there are some acquittals in our cases, it will at least validate the process," Davis continued. "At which point, [Haynes's] eyes got wide and he said, 'Wait a minute, we can't have acquittals. If we've been holding these guys for so long, how can we explain letting them get off? We can't have acquittals, we've got to have convictions.'"

Davis submitted his resignation on October 4, 2007, just hours after he was informed that Haynes had been put above him in the commissions' chain of command. "Everyone has opinions," Davis says. "But when he was put above me, his opinions became orders."

In the US military, you don't just walk out the door because you have a bad day or get passed over for promotion. This was a serious accusation. And now the military feels it needs convictions to justify the war and the continued travesty of the internment camp at Guantanamo. How the US handles this says a lot about our commitment to the rule of law.

by Christopher Heiser on February 20 09:42
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